Tony Bacigalupo highlighted in Passages: Predictable Crises of Adult Life by Gail Sheehy
"If the magic mantle of the Strong One is passed back and forth between the couple, as we saw happening with Jeb and Serena, there will be progress both in sharing and in independence. The combination is what allows genuine intimacy to flourish."


Tony Bacigalupo highlighted in Passages: Predictable Crises of Adult Life by Gail Sheehy
"Beginning with the GI Bill or scholarship that would buy the education and the FHA loan that would buy the mortgage on a house, one would then be taken care of by the union, the corporation, the bureaucracy (as part of the vast army of government employees) or welfare until the time came to draw social security benefits and cash in on one’s pension."


Tony Bacigalupo http://amzn.to/1xnzChw

Buzz Andersen highlighted in Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad by Brett Martin
"Matthew Weiner, who joined the show for season five, said, “We were exorcising David’s demons. Do you know how many decisions were based on some meeting when he was on Northern Exposure, or Rockford, or Kolchak, or some other show you’ve never heard of where he worked for three years and somebody told him ‘You can’t do that’?”"


Buzz Andersen highlighted in Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad by Brett Martin
"“The ancients valued tragedy, not merely for what it told them about the world, but for what it told them about themselves,” he said. “Almost the entire diaspora of American television and film manages to eschew that genuine catharsis, which is what tragedy is explicitly intended to channel. We don’t tolerate tragedy. We mock it. We undervalue it. We go for the laughs, the sex, the violence. We exult the individual over his fate, time and time and time again.”"


Buzz Andersen highlighted in Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad by Brett Martin
"Baltimore had a limited prior cinematic history. There had been Homicide and a triptych of films by Barry Levinson, but the city’s most significant and sustained exposure to film production had been through the oeuvre of another native son, John Waters. His was about as far from The Wire’s sensibility as it’s possible to get, but the show nevertheless wound up employing veterans of Waters’s experimental, over-the-top films—most notably Pat Moran, a flaming-red-haired barrel of a woman who handled casting of local extras and day players, and production designer Vince Peranio. It is the…"


Buzz Andersen highlighted in Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad by Brett Martin
"On-screen, Colesberry became known to viewers in the small role of hapless detective Ray Cole. Most important, he was one of the men Simon trusted to both share his mission and argue forcefully, at a level approaching his high standards, when they disagreed. For all of his clarity of vision, the veteran of open newsrooms thrived on that kind of feedback. “Whether it was Bob, or Ed Burns, or David Mills, Simon always needs a bounce,” said Johnson."


Buzz Andersen highlighted in Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad by Brett Martin
"Once, a carload of armed gang members showed up, fresh off a heist of some kind, and asked Fat Curt, another regular at Blue’s shooting gallery, who the two white dudes were. “Them the writers,” Curt said, as though every corner in Baltimore came with a pair."